Casino Deutschland

New Orleans BBQ Shrimp: Slow Food Fast

One of the goals of slow food aficionados is preserving traditional, regional cuisine. New Orleans has been doing this for almost three centuries, mainly because Creole food put down such deep, irrefutable roots. Thanks to Louisiana’s incredible natural bounty from rivers, forests, bayous, and the Gulf of Mexico, cooks from France, Spain and Africa were inspired to create America’s one true native cuisine. Their world-renowned gumbos, jambalayas and étouffées are as far from fast food as you can get, and the fact that millions of foodies still seek them out proves they’ve stood the test of time. When a handful of New Orleans chefs reconfigured classic recipes to fit the nouvelle cuisine demands of the ’70s, customers stayed away in droves until the original dishes reappeared on the menus.

Traditional New Orleans BBQ shrimp is served unshelled in a rich Creole sauce.

Traditional New Orleans BBQ shrimp is served unshelled in a rich Creole sauce.

That’s not to say certain recipes can’t bear a tweak here and there. Consider barbecued shrimp which, oddly enough, requires neither grill nor barbecue sauce. Early recipes called for letting a cooked Creole sauce stand half an hour or so before reheating, throwing in the shrimp until they’re pink and sticking the whole thing in the oven awhile. I always thought they would make great appetizers if they weren’t so time consuming, not to mention gloriously messy with all that peeling. My solution was to eliminate the sauce resting time, the oven and the shells, so people can enjoy the shrimp without dripping on themselves and your floor. Purists will rightfully cry foul because the shells give the dish its signature nutty tang, so I’ll respect the name and call it Party Shrimp instead. I’m happy to say it passed the taste test with some New  Orleans friends who gave me their ultimate compliment when food throws a party on their palates. “Man, oh, man! That is some kinda good!”

Sautéed without the shells, this updated classic is about convenience as well as taste.

Sautéed without the shells, this updated classic is about convenience as well as taste.

 

Party Shrimp

1 lb. fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined

¼ cup olive oil

¼ cup butter

1 T minced garlic

1 T. dried rosemary

¼ tsp. dried basil

¼ tsp. oregano

1 T. paprika

1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce

½ tsp. kosher salt

½ tsp. ground black pepper

1 tablespoon lemon juice

In a large skillet, combine oil, butter, garlic, rosemary, basil and oregano. Stir over medium heat until butter is melted. In a medium bowl, combine  paprika, Worcestershire, salt, pepper and lemon juice. Add shrimp to bowl and toss to combine. Add shrimp mixture to skillet and cook for 3-5 minutes until shrimp are opaque, being careful not to overcook. Transfer shrimp to platter and garnish with lemon wedges if desired. Fingers are fine but toothpicks are more civilized.

 

1 Comment

  1. Judy Leger
    Jul 3, 2013

    I can’t wait to try this version!

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *